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First World War Scottish Glengarry

Availability: In stock

$45.00

Quick Overview

This style of glengarry, with black leather band, was used until November 1914 when a chrome tanned leather band was used. Eventually the glengarry would be replaced by the tam'o'shanter in most Scottish regiments.

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This style of glengarry, with black leather band, was used until November 1914 when a chrome tanned leather band was used. Eventually the glengarry would be replaced by the tam'o'shanter in most Scottish regiments.

The invention of the glengarry is generally attributed to Alexander Ranaldson MacDonell of Glengarry and they became part of the uniform of the Glengarry Fencibles when they were raised by MacDonell in 1794; although it may have originated earlier when balmoral bonnets were bent and creased.

By 1860 the glengarry, without a diced border and usually with a feather hackle, was adopted by pipers in all regiments except by the 42nd (Black Watch), who retained the feather bonnet. By 1914 all Scottish regiments were wearing dark blue glengarries in non-ceremonial orders of dress, except for the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) who wore it in rifle green, and the Scots Guards and Royal Scots Dragoon Guards who wore peaked forage caps or bearskins. The diced bands were usually in red, white and blue but the toories on top could be red, royal blue or black, according to regiment. The diced bands along with a black cockade date back to the Jacobite risings when they were used to symbolise allegiance to the House of Hanover, whereas the blue bonnet and white cockade symbolised Jacobitism. The diced band of The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders was unique in omitting the black square in favour of three rows of red checks, in homage to the Battle of Balaclava and the stand of the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders.