Lawrance Ordnance Pty Ltd

Welcome to Lawrance Ordnance

0
You have no items in your shopping cart.

0

×

Registration

or login

First name is required!
Last name is required!
First name is not valid!
Last name is not valid!
This is not an email address!
Email address is required!
This email is already registered!
Password is required!
Enter a valid password!
Please enter 6 or more characters!
Please enter 16 or less characters!
Passwords are not same!
Terms and Conditions are required!
Email or Password is wrong!

More Views

British Mark I Steel (Brodie) Helmet

Availability: In stock

$215.00

Quick Overview

These helmets are a good quality reproduction of the British Mark I steel helmet. The style is that used between 1916 and 1917 before the rubber ring was placed in the liner. The steel shell is finished in a textured olive green paint.

* Required Fields

OR

Details

In the summer of 1915, the French Army introduced the Adrian helmet, the first steel helmet to be adopted during the First World War. The British War Office had similarly seen a need for steel helmets. After evaluating the French design, which was found to be not strong enough and too complex to be swiftly manufactured, a design patented in 1915 by John L. Brodie of London was adopted. Brodie's design was constructed in one piece and could be pressed from a single sheet of metal, giving it added strength.

The first issue helmet (Brodie's Steel Helmet, War Office Pattern) had a shallow, wide brimmed body, with a raw rim, small lugs with wire loops and a lining of America Cloth (a type of oilcloth). The lining was attached to a strap riveted to the top of the helmet body. The chinstrap comprised two pieces of leather, fastened with a claw buckle.

Production began in October 1915. With the exception of the first 4,440, produced in mild steel, the Brodie helmet was made of non-magnetic manganese steel.

A number of changes were approved in April, 1916. These included fitting a mild (magnetic) steel rim and larger lugs with wire loops to the body. A new lining was also designed. This modified helmet would be known as the Helmet, Steel, Mk.I., from September 1916.

Further modifications were made to the helmet thoughout the war. These included the addition of a rubber ring inside the top pad from June 1917 and, at around the same time, the substitution of an artificial leather called "cordite cloth" for basil leather in the headband support.

These helmets are a good quality reproduction of the British Mark I steel helmet. The style is that used between 1916 and 1917 before the rubber ring was placed in the liner. The steel shell is finished in a textured olive green paint.